Viscosupplement Injections

Glucosamine & Chondroitin Tablets Platelet Injection


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What is it and why?

  • Injection of gel-like material to cushion and mobilise the knee.

  • Two available types are available; Synvisc and Hyalgan.

  • Both are manufactured from hyaluronic acid, which is a natural substance in the joint cartilage.

  • This procedure is not NICE approved.

  • Applicable stages 4 & 5
  • Best stages 4 & 5
  • Cost Low cost

  • Treatment does not involve Home/self-help
    Home/self-help
  • Treatment involves Hospital
    Hospital
  • Treatment involves Daycase procedure
    Daycase procedure
  • Treatment does not involve Inpatient procedure
    Inpatient procedure
  • Treatment involves Local anaesthetic
    Local anaesthetic
  • Treatment does not involve General anaesthetic
    General anaesthetic
  • Treatment does not involve Regional block / Spina
    Regional block / Spina
  • Pain
    Pain

    Worse for 2+ weeks

  • Mobility
    Mobility

    Affected 2+ weeks

  • Daily activities
    Daily activities

    Minor

  • Driving
    Driving

    Minor

  • Leisure activities
    Leisure activities

    Minor

  • Light exercise
    Light exercise

    Minor

  • Heavy exercise
    Heavy exercise

    Affected 2+ weeks

  • Light work
    Light work

    Minor

  • Heavy work
    Heavy work

    Minor

  • Intimate
    Intimate

    Minor


Overview

What does it involve?

  • You will need a series of injections for this to be effective.

  • Synvisc is one injection every week for three weeks. 

  • Hyalgan is one injection every week for 5 weeks.


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Effort/burden

  • This is an outpatient procedure where the substance will be injected into the affected joint.

  • The treatment requires repeated injections.

  • You should continue with all other physical therapy methods as this treatment is unlikely to work on its own.

Benefits

  • Some studies show that these injections may decrease the pain in a select group of patients.

  • Some also report a decrease in swelling.

  • In some patients, these injections may also slow down joint wear. However, it's difficult to identify who will benefit from this.

Risks

  • Severe exacerbation of pain, infection, allergy, redness, persistent swelling, nausea, stomach pain, limp, swelling of hands or feet, back pain, headache, dizziness, runny nose and repeated sneezing are all reported risks.

  • This procedure is not recommended by NICE as an effective treatment for an arthritic knee.

Cost

  • This is a moderately low-cost option for both patients and the NHS.

  • Patient: Cost may vary depending on local arrangements. Some commissioning bodies do not authorise the use of these injections, so the procedure may need to be done under a private setting. This can cost up to £225 per injection plus an additional cost of a private consultation.

  • NHS: Between £8.80 to £45.00 per injection based on local arrangements.

What if no treatment is done?

  • Ongoing pain.

  • Arthritis may deteriorate and affect your activities of daily living (ADL), family life, work environment and leisure activities.

  • If the condition progresses, you may require a complex and more demanding procedure.

  • If it progresses significantly, there might not be any further treatments available.

  • You may regret not opting for treatment earlier.


Glucosamine & Chondroitin Tablets Platelet Injection